Tag Archives: dan nadel

di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art Debuts Two Exhibitions in 2019:

di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contacts:
danielle@frameworksf.com
kv@frameworksf.com

 di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art Debuts Two Exhibitions in 2019:

Viola Frey: Center Stage
February 23–December 29, 2019
Building a Different Model: Selections from the di Rosa Collection
March 9–December 29, 2019

Napa, CA, January 31, 2019 – di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art will showcase the work of Viola Frey and its own significant collection of Northern California art in two exhibitions in 2019. On view February 23 through December 29, 2019, Viola Frey: Center Stage marks the artist’s first major institutional survey on the West Coast since 1981 and includes more than 100 works of art, offering a fresh take on Frey’s prolific and influential practice. On view March 9 through December 29, 2019, Building a Different Model: Selections from the di Rosa Collection is the first in a series of exhibitions exploring di Rosa’s remarkable holdings of Northern California art, organized by guest curators from beyond the Bay Area.
Frey, a fiercely independent artist up to her passing in 2004, is best known for her larger-than-life figurative ceramic sculptures. Viola Frey: Center Stage traces her career through a chronological progression spanning five decades. A large portion of the featured work—which includes not just ceramics, but also painting, drawing, photography, and bronze—has never been shown publicly.
Monumental ceramic works, including The Decline and Fall of Western Civilization (1992) and China Goddess Group (ca. 1979–81) will be shown alongside early works from the 1960s and 1970s, presenting an unprecedented look at the artist’s thinking and process. The large-scale presentation will occupy di Rosa’s 8,500-square-foot Gallery 2, marking the first time the gallery has been devoted to the work of a single artist. The exhibition draws from a mix of di Rosa’s extensive holdings, generous loans from Artists’ Legacy Foundation, and private collections.
“Frey’s wide-ranging interests—from identity to class, culture, consumerism, and environmental issues, with an undeniable undercurrent of feminist statement—parallel many of the pressing issues of our day,” observes curator Amy Owen. “This presentation is a long-overdue look at an artist working far ahead of her time.”
This is the first of three major solo exhibitions at di Rosa, rolling out over 2019 and 2020, focusing on singular artistic voices in Northern California art history. Exhibitions in 2020 will feature the work of Jean Conner and Deborah Remington. The series shines a light on the artists’ years living and working in the Bay Area, highlighting their shared impulse to draw inspiration from the personal, cultural, and environmental realms, and how critical aspects of the region enabled their work to develop and flourish. While their practices may not be viewed as overtly feminist, their distinct approaches to art making and their strong, independent spirits demonstrate an approach to feminism rooted in lived experience and unshakeable determination.
Viola Frey was born in Lodi, California, in 1933, and died in Oakland in 2004. She received her BFA and an honorary doctorate from California College of Arts and Crafts and attended graduate school at Tulane University. She was awarded two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, the Award of Honor in Sculpture from the San Francisco Arts Commission, and many other grants and awards. Her work is in numerous public and private collections worldwide.
This exhibition is curated by Amy Owen in conjunction with the Artists’ Legacy Foundation, Oakland.
Building a Different Model: Selections from the di Rosa Collection is the first in a series of exhibitions exploring di Rosa’s remarkable holdings of Northern California art, organized by guest curators from beyond the Bay Area.
“One of the great strengths of postwar Northern California painting and sculpture is the collective reimagining of what art and the world can be,” says di Rosa Executive Director Robert Sain. “The di Rosa collection offers a vision apart from most art histories, one led by individual sensibilities focused on building languages of communication and community.”
Curated by Dan Nadel, some 70 works by 40 artists in Building a Different Model address the world through generative visions of transformation and repair through social, physical, and ceremonial relationships. Carlos Villa and K. Lee Manuel made garments-as-art or ceremonial garb; Norman Stiegelmeyer and Robert Bechtle offer visions of psychic shifts; paintings by William Theophilus Brown, Irene Pijoan, Oliver Lee Jackson, and Joan Brown catch their subjects on the cusp of social change. Exhibited here for the first time are 12 collaborative drawings by William Allan and friends William T. Wiley, Robert Hudson, Robert Nelson, and Bill Geis, which were made for Dorothy Wiley and Gunvor Nelson’s 70-minute film Five Artists: BillBobBillBillBob (1971) about those artists and their families. These and a handful of related drawings memorialize the ethos documented in the film and remain a powerful example of the collaborative, community-based art and life that found fertile ground at di Rosa itself.
“I selected works that surprised me and might surprise a visitor based on our knowledge of the art and artists,” said Nadel. He wanted to show extra dimensions of each artist, when possible, and bring to the fore artists who are known in the Bay Area but not much outside of it, like Oliver Lee Jackson and Carlos Villa. “It was important to me that this not be another show of ‘the usual gang’ or ‘funk art,’” he says.
Nadel focuses on the idea of “repair,” guided by two works by Bill Allan and William T. Wiley that appeared in the 1969 Repair Show at Berkeley Gallery: Indian History Repair (1969) and Repair for Super Natural Events and Natural Events (1969). The theme, repairing ourselves and our communities, is emphasized through collaboration (thus the 12 collaborative drawings), ritual (Carlos Villa), spiritual awareness (Stiegelmeyer, Bechtle, Pijoan, H.C. Westermann, Gage Taylor, James Melchert) and art made for the sake of demonstrating new ways to think about life and the land around us (Allan’s Rome painting, Paul Kos’s drawings). Nadel hopes visitors will come away with a sense that art can be transformative, and that these artists were working with the intent to demonstrate its potential for personal and communal revelation.
Based in New York, writer and curator Dan Nadel has previously curated the exhibitions What Nerve! Alternative Figures in American Art: 1960 to the Present, Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence (2014) and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (2015), Victor Moscoso: Psychedelic Drawings, 1967–1982, Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York (2015), Return of the Repressed: Destroy All Monsters 1973–1977, PRISM, Los Angeles (2011); Karl Wirsum: Drawings 1967–1970, Derek Eller Gallery, New York (2010), Suellen Rocca: Bare Shouldered Beauty, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (2016); The House That Jack Built, the first major Jack Kirby retrospective, Fumetto, Lucerne, Switzerland (2010), Macronauts, Athens Biennale (2007), The Passing of Time: Michael Hurson at Work, 1971–2001, Paula Cooper Gallery, New York (2017); Gertrude Abercrombie, Karma, New York (2018), Red Grooms, Handiwork 1955–2018, Marlborough Contemporary, New York (2018); and Alan Turner: Paintings 1979–2009, Parker Gallery, Los Angeles (2018). Nadel is a frequent contributor to Artforum and the New York Review of Books and has authored the books The Collected Hairy Who Publications (Matthew Marks Gallery, 2015), Art Out of Time: Unknown Comics Visionaries 1900–1969 (Harry N. Abrams, 2006), and Dorothy and Otis: Designing the American Dream (Harper Design, 2014).
Viola Frey: Center Stage is on view February 23 through December 29, 2019. Building a Different Model: Selections from the di Rosa Collection is on view March 9 through December 29, 2019. A public reception for both exhibitions takes place Saturday, March 9, 2019, 4–5:30 p.m.
For details about upcoming public programs related to the exhibitions, visit www.dirosaart.org.
ABOUT DI ROSA CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART
di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art presents contemporary exhibitions and educational programs for all ages and maintains a permanent collection of notable works by artists living or working in the San Francisco Bay Area from the mid-twentieth century to the present day. A wide range of styles, media, and subject matter provides an overview of the creative energy and freedom to experiment that characterizes this region of California. di Rosa features multiple galleries, a sculpture park, and a 35-acre lake, located on 217 scenic acres in Napa Valley’s famed Carneros region that are protected in perpetuity under the Napa County Land Trust. di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art is located at 5200 Sonoma Highway, Napa. The galleries are open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. For more information, visit dirosaart.org.
CONTACT
For images, interview requests, and curatorial media tours, contact
info@frameworksf.com
DOWNLOAD PDF COPY

AFTERNOON EXCHANGE: William Allan and Peter Saul with Dan Nadel

Gallery 2
$10 GENERAL / $5 MEMBERS / FREE WITH DI ROSA DAYS ADMISSION
(priority seating for Afternoon Exchange ticket holders)

We encourage you to carpool as parking is limited.

Space for this event is limited, please note that priority seating will be given to Afternoon Exchange ticket holders.

In conjunction with Building a Different Model: Selections from the di Rosa Collection, join guest curator Dan Nadel along with artists Peter Saul and William Allan for this lively conversation and idea exchange. Highlighting some of the concentric circles of collaboration, influence and collegiality within the exhibition, the two painters will be in conversation about art, ideas, and their 1967 film with Bruce Nauman, Untitled (Flour Arrangements), in which the two artists talked about ways of seeing and making. The original film will be screened, followed by “the same talk but with different words” with Allan and Saul, along with Nadel.

Dan Nadel is a writer and curator based in New York. His past exhibitions include Samaritans, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York (2019); Gertrude Abercrombie, Karma, New York (2018); Red Grooms, Handiwork 1955–2018, Marlborough Contemporary, New York (2018); What Nerve! Alternative Figures in American Art: 1960 to the Present, RISD Museum, Providence, and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (2014–15); Return of the Repressed: Destroy All Monsters 1973–1977, Prism, Los Angeles (2011); and The Passing of Time: Michael Hurson at Work, 1971–2001, Paula Cooper Gallery, New York (2017–18). Nadel is a frequent contributor to Artforum and the New York Review of Books. He has authored several books, including The Collected Hairy Who Publications (Matthew Marks, 2015), Art Out of Time: Unknown Comics Visionaries 1900–1969 (Abrams, 2006), and Dorothy and Otis: Designing the American Dream (Harper Design, 2015). His upcoming exhibitions include Landscape without Boundaries and Kathy Butterly, both at the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art, Davis.

Peter Saul was born in 1934 in San Francisco, California. He studied at the California School of Fine Arts from 1950-1952 and the Washington University School of Fine Arts from 1952-56. Saul is considered one of the fathers of Pop Art. He is known for his distinctively colorful and cartoonish paintings which satirize American culture. In his over fifty year career, Saul has depicted the most pressing issues of society in a manner that destroys pretensions, exposes artificiality, and heightens awareness. Saul has been the recipient of numerous honors and awards throughout his career including the the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 1993, and he was elected to the American Academy of Art and Letters in 2010. Saul’s works have been exhibited widely nationally and internationally and can be found in major collections around the world including Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, Napa; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

William Allan was born in 1936 in Everett, Washington. He received his BFA from the California School of Fine Arts in 1958. Throughout his career, Allan has worked across multiple media including drawing, painting, sculpture, and film. His early experiments in film and performance with artist Bruce Nauman embraced tenets that marked his entire career: poetic observation of our relationship to nature and the ways human consciousness intersects its flow. Allan’s work has been exhibited widely nationally and internationally including the seminal exhibition Funk curated by Peter Selz at the Berkeley Art Museum in 1967 (alongside Saul) and his first major solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1974, curated by Marcia Tucker. Allan’s work is included in major collections including the Anderson Collection at Stanford University; Berkeley Art Museum; the Art Institute of Chicago; di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, Napa; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Oakland Museum of California; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Peter Saul Flour Arrangement

William Allan, Bruce Nauman, and Peter Saul, Untitled (Flour Arrangements) (still), 1967. Video made for the National Center for Experiments in Television (NCET), KQED-TV, San Francisco. 24 min., 9 sec. Courtesy of University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.