Tag Archives: di Rosa Collection

Cocktails with a Curator | June 10, 17, 24

Digital Content | At Home

Gather your barware and join di Rosa Associate Curator Twyla Ruby for a spirited happy hour program.

 

For three Thursdays in June, a cocktail will be selected to pair with an artwork from the “Residence Rehang” section of The Incorrect Museum: Vignettes from the di Rosa Collection. Artwork and cocktail pairings, along with recipes for how to make them at home will be announced soon. 

Incorrect Previews: Explorations of Exhibition Vignettes with Kate Eilertsen & Twyla Ruby | At Home

Perspectives | At Home

Listen to Executive Director and Curator Kate Eilertsen and Curatorial Associate Twyla Ruby discuss the history of Northern California art through the context of the artwork represented in The Incorrect Museum: Vignettes from the di Rosa Collection

Each preview covers two vignettes:

Sweet Land of Funk / The Pot Palace

Dude Ranch Dada / Nut Art

The Museum of Conceptual Art /  Worlds in Collision

These programs are offered as part of di Rosa’s at home digital content.

The Incorrect Museum: Vignettes from the di Rosa Collection

Gallery 2

Welcome to the exhibition’s microsite

Scroll down to read the introductory wall text and click the icons below to enter vignettes.

“Come on out and let go/to return again while getting to know/that here the art invites a titter/from the free admitter/That here art is a healthy remedy/with a laugh at rascality not posing as ponderosity.” - Rene di Rosa

Rene di Rosa viewed his collection of more than 1600 objects, accumulated over five decades from the 1960s until his death in 2010, as a sort of “incorrect museum.” In 1997, when the preserve opened its doors to the public, di Rosa memorialized the occasion in verse, penning a “singalong for an incorrect museum” which was distributed to early visitors: “Come on out and let go/to return again while getting to know/that here the art invites a titter/from the free admitter/That here art is a healthy remedy/with a laugh at rascality not posing as ponderosity.”

di Rosa’s vision of an “incorrect museum” is a potent concept, especially today as museums across the world reassess their institutional histories, missions and values. What, exactly, made the di Rosa an “incorrect museum” in the eyes of its founder? 

di Rosa, along with many of the artists he collected, strictly opposed the aesthetic and social conventions of the mainstream art world, which he viewed as pretentious, sterile and fundamentally conservative.

Unlike major museums in New York and Los Angeles, di Rosa welcomed the public free of charge, reflecting a populist vision for the arts. Similarly, he rejected the bland art-speak peddled by gallerists and curators, eschewing the use of exhibition labels to cultivate a more immediate and personal exchange between artwork and viewer. 

Even the personal residence di Rosa shared with his wife Veronica was imbued with an “incorrect” spirit, with works installed ceiling-to-floor in a playful salon style. The entryway of The Incorrect Museum is installed similarly, as a tribute to di Rosa’s curatorial vision. In the main gallery, we present six vignettes exploring how di Rosa’s “incorrect” sensibility was informed by the Bay Area’s unique artistic milieu. As this exhibition shows, the ideal of “incorrectness” was a lodestone for generations of Bay Area artists.

The works in the collection had a distinctly “incorrect” flavor which tended, di Rosa wrote, to invoke a “curatorial frown” from cultural gatekeepers in large, international museums.

 

 The collection focused on Bay Area artists—like Bruce Conner, William T. Wiley, Robert Arneson and Roy De Forest, among others—whose work was too colorful, ungainly, humorous and irreverent to be easily interpreted or consumed by art world afficionados. di Rosa also supported local artists—including Peter Voulkos, Jim Melchert, Tom Marioni and Paul Kos—who blurred the line between art and life, creating conceptual works rooted in experience that were not easily bought or sold.

We invite you to celebrate the shared “rascality” of these artists. The art and artists of Northern California have too often been overlooked by critics and historians of twentieth century art.

Kate Eilertsen, Executive Director and Curator

Twyla Ruby, Curatorial Associate

Ceramic Interventions: Nicki Green, Sahar Khoury, & Maria Paz

Gallery 1
Nicki Green, The Porous Sea (Tub), 2019. Glazed earthenware with cotton quilt.
Sahar Khoury, Untitled (bone holder with two charms wall relief), 2021 Ceramic, cement, pigmented paper mache, resin, vinyl paint, steel. Courtesy the artist and Rebecca Camacho Presents, San Francisco
Maria Paz, Camilo Marcelo Catrillanca, 2021 Ceramic, glaze 22 x 26 x 12 inches

The Bay Area has a longstanding tradition of radical experimentation in ceramic arts and, in recent years, many of the region’s most exciting young artists have chosen clay as their medium. This exhibition highlights three emerging artists working in this space, exploring a range of contemporary interventions in ceramic tradition.

Nicki Green, Sahar Khoury and Maria Paz all speak about the respect they have for ceramic’s durability, elasticity and strength, and are deeply engaged with the legacy of Bay Area ceramics. However, their practices represent unique modes of ceramic intervention. Green uses clay to create objects that explore history, ritual and the aesthetics of otherness. Khoury, meanwhile, engages in a practice of “creative repair” to create sculptures and installations that incorporate clay with cement, metal, textile and papier-mâché as well as rejected or found materials. Paz, finally, archives her personal and family history on ceramic vessels as an act of resilience and resistance.

Highlighting a wide range of recent works, Ceramic Interventions shows that clay remains an exciting and vital medium for today’s emerging artists.

 

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About the Artists

Nicki Green is a transdisciplinary artist working primarily in clay. Originally from New England, she completed her BFA in sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2009 and her MFA in Art Practice from the University of California, Berkeley in 2018. Her sculptures, ritual objects and various flat works explore topics of history preservation, conceptual ornamentation and aesthetics of otherness. Green has exhibited her work internationally, notably at the New Museum, New York; The Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; Rockelmann & Partner Gallery, Berlin, Germany. She has contributed texts to numerous publications including a recent piece in Duke University Press’ Transgender Studies Quarterly and a piece in Fermenting Feminism, Copenhagen. In 2019, Green was a finalist for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s SECA Award, a recipient of an Arts/Industry Residency from the John Michael Kohler Art Center, among other awards. Green lives and works in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Sahar Khoury is an artist based in Oakland, California.  Khoury makes sculptures that integrate abstraction, personal and political symbols, and an intuitive sensitivity to site. Experimenting with juxtapositions of found or fabricated items with more familiar artist materials such as clay and papier-mâché, she continues to develop an idiosyncratic approach, with a primary commitment to material enquiry. She received her BA in Anthropology from UC Santa Cruz in 1996 and her MFA From UC Berkeley in 2013. She was the recipient of The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 2019 biannual SECA Art Award and the 2018 Triennial Exhibition, Bay Area Now 8 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Khoury’s work has been exhibited at SFMOMA, YBCA, Oakland Museum of California, The Wattis Institute, UC Berkeley Art Museum, Rebecca Camacho (SF) and CANADA (NY). Khoury’s work has been written about in the New Yorker, Art Review, and Hyperallergic.

Maria Paz (b. Quilpue, Chile) is a self- taught sculptor based in Oakland, California. Her ceramic sculptures serve as archival objects, often exploring the bond broken with her home country and how her experience as an immigrant in the United States has shaped a multiplicity of identities within her. Recently, Paz has exhibited work at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco), San Jose Institute of Contemporary Arts (San Jose, CA), Pt. 2 Gallery (Oakland, CA), and Southern Exposure (San Francisco, CA). Paz has held workshops at the Contemporary Jewish Museum (San Francisco, CA) and was a finalist for the 2019-2020 TOSA Studio Award. She was awarded the Bed Stuy Arts Residency in Brooklyn, New York and is currently preparing for a group exhibition focused on community healing at Part 2 Gallery (Oakland, CA).

 

Curated by Curatorial Associate Twyla Ruby, with Executive Director Kate Eilertsen, and Director of Education & Civic Engagement Andrea Saenz Williams.